E-ISSN 2717-7122
 

Review Article 


Curriculum Differentiation’s Capacity to Extend Gifted Students in Secondary Mixed-ability Science Classes

Christine Ireland, Terence V. Bowles, Kimberley A. Brindle, Susan Nikakis.

Abstract
Investigated were differences between teachers’ and students’ perceptions of
curriculum differentiation strategies to extend highly able students in mixedability secondary science classes. Gifted underachievement and disengagement is increasing in Australian schools, potentially linked to these perception differences regarding curriculum differentiation. 161, Year 7 students,
aged aproximately 11 years (n = 29 highly able; n = 132 non-highly able), and
43 science-trained teachers were surveyed. Examined were students’ and
teachers’ perceptions of the importance and achievability of 24 curriculum
differentiation strategies, within the curriculum components of content, process, product, and environment. Significant dissimilarities occurred regarding curriculum differentiation strategies having been achieved at least once
during every work unit. In particular, some strategies requiring modification
of the learning environment were considered by highly able students to be
significantly less frequently achieved, compared to teachers’ perceptions. Implications for policy and practice were explored. Further research of curriculum differentiation that includes students’ perspectives is required

Key words: curriculum differentiation, gifted education, highly able students, non-highly able students, mixed-ability classes


 
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How to Cite this Article
Pubmed Style

Christine Ireland, Terence V. Bowles, Kimberley A. Brindle, Susan Nikakis. Curriculum Differentiation’s Capacity to Extend Gifted Students in Secondary Mixed-ability Science Classes. Talent. 2020; 10(1): 40-61.


Web Style

Christine Ireland, Terence V. Bowles, Kimberley A. Brindle, Susan Nikakis. Curriculum Differentiation’s Capacity to Extend Gifted Students in Secondary Mixed-ability Science Classes. http://www.talentjournal.net/?mno=91183 [Access: July 10, 2021].


AMA (American Medical Association) Style

Christine Ireland, Terence V. Bowles, Kimberley A. Brindle, Susan Nikakis. Curriculum Differentiation’s Capacity to Extend Gifted Students in Secondary Mixed-ability Science Classes. Talent. 2020; 10(1): 40-61.



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

Christine Ireland, Terence V. Bowles, Kimberley A. Brindle, Susan Nikakis. Curriculum Differentiation’s Capacity to Extend Gifted Students in Secondary Mixed-ability Science Classes. Talent. (2020), [cited July 10, 2021]; 10(1): 40-61.



Harvard Style

Christine Ireland, Terence V. Bowles, Kimberley A. Brindle, Susan Nikakis (2020) Curriculum Differentiation’s Capacity to Extend Gifted Students in Secondary Mixed-ability Science Classes. Talent, 10 (1), 40-61.



Turabian Style

Christine Ireland, Terence V. Bowles, Kimberley A. Brindle, Susan Nikakis. 2020. Curriculum Differentiation’s Capacity to Extend Gifted Students in Secondary Mixed-ability Science Classes. Talent, 10 (1), 40-61.



Chicago Style

Christine Ireland, Terence V. Bowles, Kimberley A. Brindle, Susan Nikakis. "Curriculum Differentiation’s Capacity to Extend Gifted Students in Secondary Mixed-ability Science Classes." Talent 10 (2020), 40-61.



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

Christine Ireland, Terence V. Bowles, Kimberley A. Brindle, Susan Nikakis. "Curriculum Differentiation’s Capacity to Extend Gifted Students in Secondary Mixed-ability Science Classes." Talent 10.1 (2020), 40-61. Print.



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

Christine Ireland, Terence V. Bowles, Kimberley A. Brindle, Susan Nikakis (2020) Curriculum Differentiation’s Capacity to Extend Gifted Students in Secondary Mixed-ability Science Classes. Talent, 10 (1), 40-61.