E-ISSN 2717-7122
 

Review Article 


Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness

Joseph S. Renzulli.

Abstract
After repeatedly observing the little boy crying on the school bus, Melanie, a fifth grade student, took a seat next to him and struck up a conversation. “You don’t understand,” said Tony, a first grader whose face was practically hidden behind the thickest eyeglasses Melanie had ever seen. “You see these glasses? I’m partially sighted. The kids trip me and make fun of me; I have special books for my subjects, but there are no books in the library that I can read. ”Later that day Melanie approached her enrichment teacher and asked if she could make Tony her “Type III” Project [Type III Enrichment in The Enrichment Triad Model (Renzulli, 1977, p.22) is a self-selected individual or small group investigation of a real problem] for the year. Over the next sev-eral days, Melanie and the enrichment teacher drew up a plan that began with some “friendly persuasion” for the boys that were harassing Tony. A few of the school’s bigger, well-respected boys and girls escorted him from the school bus and sat with him in the lunchroom. Melanie then asked Tony a series of questions from an instrument called the Interest-A-Lyzer to deter-mine what some of his reading interests might be. She recruited a number of the school’s best writers to work on large print "big books” that dealt with Tony’s interests in sports and adventure stories. She also recruited the school’s best artists to illustrate the books, and served as the editor and pro-duction manager for the series. As the project progressed over the next sev-eral months, a remarkable change took place in Tony’s attitude toward school. He became a local celebrity, and other students even signed out books from Tony’s special section of the library. Melanie’s creative idea and her task commitment resulted in the development of profound empathy and sen-sitivity to human concerns and the application of her talents to an unselfish cause. When questioned about her work, Melanie explained simply, “It didn’t change the world, but it changed the world of one little boy.”


 
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Pubmed Style

Joseph S. Renzulli. Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness . Talent. 2020; 10(1): 1-20.


Web Style

Joseph S. Renzulli. Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness . http://www.talentjournal.net/?mno=90878 [Access: July 14, 2021].


AMA (American Medical Association) Style

Joseph S. Renzulli. Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness . Talent. 2020; 10(1): 1-20.



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

Joseph S. Renzulli. Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness . Talent. (2020), [cited July 14, 2021]; 10(1): 1-20.



Harvard Style

Joseph S. Renzulli (2020) Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness . Talent, 10 (1), 1-20.



Turabian Style

Joseph S. Renzulli. 2020. Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness . Talent, 10 (1), 1-20.



Chicago Style

Joseph S. Renzulli. "Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness ." Talent 10 (2020), 1-20.



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

Joseph S. Renzulli. "Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness ." Talent 10.1 (2020), 1-20. Print.



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

Joseph S. Renzulli (2020) Promoting Social Capital by Expanding the Conception of Giftedness . Talent, 10 (1), 1-20.